Posts Tagged ‘Neurosurgery’

Jacob Harpel’s Thanksgiving Story

November 25, 2010

Eight-year-old Jacob Harpel from Glencoe, Minn., was diagnosed with a plum-sized brain tumor the day before Thanksgiving last year. He had aggressive brain surgery at Mayo Clinic in August to remove the tumor; with the surgery he had a 50% chance of losing his peripheral vision on one side and a 50% chance of speech and comprehension deficits. Within 24 hours of the surgery, Jacob was playing the piano at Saint Marys Hospital, and just three days later he went home tumor-free.

This week, exactly a year from the initial diagnosis, Jacob had follow-up appointments at Mayo Clinic — he’s still tumor-free, his vision is 20/20 including peripheral vision, he has no speech or comprehension deficits and he’s seizure-free. It’s quite a different Thanksgiving for the whole Harpel family.

View the videos below to hear the Harpel family tell their story, including their description of playing “Just Dance” on the Wii during Jacob’s video EEG, Jacob saying that the surgery was easy, “I just slept the whole time,” and the support of their family and friends. And as for their Mayo Clinic physicians? Jacob says about Dr. Nicholas Wetjen, his pediatric neurosurgeon – “I LOVE that man!”

Deep Brain Stimulation on ABC World News

March 19, 2010

ABC World News Tonight ran a story yesterday about Roger Frisch, a solo violinist and associate concertmaster for the Minnesota Orchestra, and how he came to Mayo Clinic and Dr. Kendall Lee for relief of a career-threatening tremor.

Watch the story.

For background, Dr. Lee discusses how and why surgery is done in these cases while the patient remains awake and even performing crucial activities:

Dr. Lee also describes related research on deep brain stimulation:

Mayo Clinic uses and conducts research into deep brain stimulation on all three campuses: Arizona, Florida and Minnesota.

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Finding Answers at Mayo Clinic

September 15, 2009

After seeing numerous medical professionals in her hometown for a stabbing pain in her face, Amy Abts was referred to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. At Mayo Clinic, Amy saw a neurologist who diagnosed her with Trigeminal Neuralgia, a rare condition named for the three-part (trigeminal) nerve. It is this nerve that delivers sensations to the face.

To get the pain under control, her neurologist tried a couple different medications. When the medications did not work, her neurologist and a neurosurgeon determined the best option was a surgical procedure called a Microvascular Decompression. The surgical procedure consisted of separating the nerve and blood vessels and inserting a Teflon plate between them to alleviate the pressure.

In the following video, Amy talks about her visit to Mayo Clinic and her diagnosis and successful treatment of trigeminal neuralgia.

To learn more about Trigeminal Neuralgia, visit: http://www.mayoclinic.org/trigeminal-neuralgia/